ABOVE THE LINE
Are You Above The Line?  Seven Core Principles of DFI
4:  THE POWER OF THE UNIT

"Our core message is very straightforward. Trust is earned through your behavior, not granted by your position. And it is earned through repeated behavior over time. It takes three things to build trust - character, competence, and connection." 

- JACK MILLS, DFI COUNSEL

Legendary Agent, Adjunct Law Professor, University of Colorado

What motivates DFI players to give maximum effort and play with selfless commitment?  One key is called small-unit cohesion. The military calls it 'combat motivation.' What motivates soldiers to engage in combat? How do you train soldiers to fight and win? How do you train and equip soldiers to sustain combat motivation during periods of prolonged conflict? The strongest motivation for enduring combat, especially for U.S. soldiers, is the bond formed among members of a squad or platoon. This cohesion is the single most important sustaining and motivating force for combat soldiers. Simply put, soldiers fight because of the other members of their small unit.


"A true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him." 
-- U.S. Army Major Robert J. Reilly 


Trust is something that every team talks about and wants, but few truly get. Trust is belief in the reliability of a person. It is confidence that you can count on a person. In order to train and compete at an elite level, you must push each other hard. Very hard. But you can push only to the level of trust you have built. 

Strength in one of these areas cannot make up for weakness in another. 

  1. Character - is ethical trust. This can only be built through repeated experience of you doing what you say you will do. 

  2. Competence - is technical trust. This is built through repeated experience of you doing your job, and making team better. 

  3. Connection - is personal trust. This is built through repeated experience of caring, listening and fully engaging with the people on the team. 

 

It is important to remember that other people do not experience your intentions - they experience your behavior. If you expect others to trust you, they must experience your character and competence, and they must experience a personal connection with you. Repeatedly. Over time. Especially in difficult conditions. 

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